Anchorage Inn

Coupeville WA

INNformer #134

INNformer #134 Jan 12 2012


It’s a new year! Although it’s the height of winter, all in all it’s been rather mellow here in Coupeville. Not much rain has fallen on this island and not a flake of snow is yet to be seen. Looking out our kitchen window, wound amongst the rose bush branches, we still have a healthy Nasturtium alive and well with about a dozen orange flowers awaiting harvest to decorate our morning dishes.

From one facelift to another the Anchorage Inn has changed from a colorful appearance of Fall for Thanksgiving and then again within a couple of days to welcoming twinkle of CHRISTmas decor just in time to welcome the annual Greening of Coupeville evening parade. Last week we neatly packaged her up and stored her away until Oct of 2012. Already, we’re planning the charming decor for Valentines Day. How about a lovers escape?

Just one more thought about CHRISTmas. Those carols have come and gone, and with them some of our favorites. One song with mysterious lyrics is The 12 Days of Christmas. I recently learned some very interesting facts.

From 1558 until 1829, Roman Catholics in England were not permitted to practice their faith openly. Someone during that era wrote this carol as a catechism song for young Catholics. It has two levels of meaning: the surface meaning plus a hidden meaning known only to members of their church. Each element in the carol has a code word for a religious reality which the children could remember.

-The partridge in a pear tree was Jesus Christ.
-Two turtle doves were the Old and New Testaments.
-Three French hens stood for faith, hope and love.-
-The four calling birds were the four gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke & John.
-The five golden rings recalled the Torah or Law, the first five books of the Old Testament.
-The six geese a-laying stood for the six days of creation.
-Seven swans a-swimming represented the sevenfold gifts of the Holy Spirit–Prophesy, Serving, Teaching, Exhortation, Contribution, Leadership, and Mercy.
-The eight maids a-milking were the eight beatitudes.
-Nine ladies dancing were the nine fruits of the Holy Spirit–Love, Joy, Peace, Patience, Kindness, Goodness, Faithfulness, Gentleness, and Self Control.
-The ten lords a-leaping were the ten commandments.
-The eleven pipers piping stood for the eleven faithful disciples.
-The twelve drummers drumming symbolized the twelve points of belief in the Apostles’ Creed.
So there is your history for today. This knowledge was shared with me and I found it interesting and enlightening and now I know how that strange song became a Christmas Carol.

For those who missed it!

With the cold morning air and late rising sun a bowl of cold cereal doesn’t quite hit the mark. How about one of Dianne’s entrees from her well worn cookbook. She’s been serving this dish for years to thousands of guests. The Cheesy Egg Bake…….
Pre-heat oven to 350 degrees

Ingredients:
1 lb Monterey Jack Cheese (4 cups)
10 extra large eggs
1 pint creamed cottage cheese (2 cups)
1/2 cup white flour
1 tsp baking powder

Preparation:
Shred the Monterey Jack Cheese.
In a large mixer bowl beat eggs until blended. Add everything else.
Pour the mixture into a well greased 9″ x 13″ dish, or individual baking dishes
and bake for approximately 45 minutes, until a knife inserted into the middle
comes out clean. Serve immediately while it is pretty and fluffy.

This will serve 10 people for brunch if a large fruit salad and rolls are added.
It can be made the night before, refrigerated and baked just before serving.
Allow extra baking time if it has been in the refrigerator over night.

Our neighbor gave us a call last week and reported that his patio was almost flooded. He new that rain couldn’t be the cause and with further investigation he followed the wetness across his yard and found the source was coming from under our Calista Cottage. It wasn’t just wet, but actually almost had a bit of a current to it. We quickly turned the water main off and after opening a small trap door on the skirt of the cottage began to look for the cause. It was cold and dark under our old saloon with a floor that was only dirt or mud and a space of about 2 feet. This crawl space had earned its name. Had the pipes frozen and burst underground, under the house? As I slowly slid along I began to hear dripping beneath the bathroom and was somewhat relieved. I still couldn’t see it’s exact source but had a good idea.
Our plumber discovered that the pipes had merely separated at a joint. The cause is not for sure, but the repair was quick with no damage to the cottage. He estimated that the water had been flowing at full flow for a number of days.

Our 16th Innkeeping 101 student will soon be with us for our 2 day course. The whole idea behind our course is to give those interested in the possibility of becoming innkeepers a good taste, answer questions, instruct and have fun. Then they can make a wise decision about their next step. See our outline on our web site http://www.anchorage-inn.com. Of our last 15 to take the course, 11 are now successful innkeepers, 2 have learned that they are not yet prepared, 1 discovered that innkeeping was not for them and 1 are now successful inn “sitters”.

World travelers since we last spoke, has only been Canada. For 2011, we set an all time record for our northern neighbors.

Returning Guests that have been awarded Anchorage Inn discounts since our last INNformer totaled:

Returning Guests that have been awarded Anchorage Inn discounts since our last INNformer totaled:
3rd & 4th visit reservation for the 10% Pancake discount = 4
5th thru 9th visit reservation for the 12% Omelet discount = 1
10th thru 19th visit reservation for the 15% Quiche discount = 1
20 or more visits reservation for the 20% French Toast discount = 1

Coupeville – The shortest distance to far away.
Your innkeepers,

Dave and Dianne

January 20, 2012 Posted by | INNformer Newsletter, Life at the Inn | Leave a comment

INNformer #133

INNformer #133       Nov 18


Winter greetings to our Mainlanders, Islanders and all our Pumpkinologists,

Yes, I said Winter. We’ve received our first light snowfall on central Whidbey this week and the temperature in the morning has been flirting with freezing. Most trees have lost a majority of their golden leaves, our clocks have once again fallen behind and we’ve lit our first fire in the fireplace. One thing nice about Winters arrival is that Spring is a bit closer and the pumpkin seed will begin its cycle once again. Speaking of seeds…..

According to the Guinness Book of World Records, the largest seed in the world is that of the giant fan palm Locoicea maldivica, commonly known as the double coconut or coco de mer near the Indian Ocean. It can weigh up to 44 lbs. and may take 10 years to develop. A single seed may be 12 inches long and nearly 3 feet in circumference. The smallest seed comes from the epiphytic orchid found in tropical rain forests and totals about 35 million seeds per ounce! That’s right, one seed weighs about one 35 millionths of an ounce. Orchid seeds are dispersed into the air like minute dust particles or single-celled spores, eventually coming to rest in the upper canopy of rain forest trees.

Our professional seed counters.
” Because the month is 10, the temperature is 61, I have 4 grandchildren and I picked 122 apples and 92 pears, it’s obvious Pumpky has 289 seeds.”
” If Pumpkinstilskin weighed 108 pounds and the Anchorage Inn has 7 rooms, I’ll guess 756 seeds.”
” Mary says pumpkin has 7 letters. Pumpkinstilskin has 15 = 715 seeds. That wasn’t hard.”

Pumpkinstilskin sat proudly on our front lawn, patiently awaiting the arrival of Nov 11th. One year, 2006, my pumpkin “Brooklynn” was so dense that it only had room to produce 21 seeds. My first pumpkin “Wylie” which was my biggest ever, had 427 seeds. We had 22 folks send in their guesses this year. They ranged from 21 to 5,555 seeds.
Together, our visiting son, daughter-in-law and 3 grand daughters, opened Pumpkinstilskin by first removed his crow-pecked, sunken and scarred area and then peeked in. And what did we see??? A bright orange interior with only a few visible seeds! Portion by portion, As the sky grew darker and raindrops began to fall, I quickly cut out 1-2 lb sections. Just like a well lubricated pumpkin machine, we quickly bagged sections, scooped out slippery seeds and stuff and ran for shelter before getting too wet.

Into the kitchen we took our bucket of orange slop and began the slimey job of searching and counting. Well, Pumpky had 264 seeds. Our winner, the closest, without going over, was Ed and Judy V. with a guess of 247. And the closest to the total was Wendie N. and Mike B. with a guess of 268 to win honorable mention. Good job everyone.

What do you do with 108 pounds of pumpkin? Our son said we ought to make pumpkin pie. We all love pumpkin pie, so why not? So we gathered up 2 big chunks and went to Google. We found our instructions and the whole family got involved and like a well lubricated pumpkin pie machine we began. It wasn’t difficult but it was time consuming. After 3 hours we had made 2 pies included their crusts and they were delicious. This will be a family tradition I’m sure! The rest of the chunks went to our local farm to feed the cattle in exchange for some cow pies for next year’s garden.

 

World travelers since we last spoke have been Ireland and Canada.

Returning Guests that have been awarded Anchorage Inn discounts since our last INNformer totaled:
3rd & 4th visit           reservation for the 10% Pancake discount = 6
5th thru 9th visit       reservation for the 12% Omelet discount = 1
10th thru 19th visit   reservation for the 15% Quiche discount = 0
20 or more visits      reservation for the 20% French Toast discount = 2
That’s quite a turnout of Pancake patrons!!!!

Coupeville – The shortest distance to far away.
Your innkeepers,

Dave and Dianne

November 20, 2011 Posted by | INNformer Newsletter, Life at the Inn | Leave a comment

INNformer #132

Another chance to win a free night! See Round 3 below!!!

INNformer #132       Oct 13

Autumn greetings Mainlanders, Islanders and all those pumpkinologists,

Green, yellow and colorful are only three words that describe the farms across America. But you don’t need to be singing with McDonald on his farm, frantically looking for the root cellar with Dorothy, or lost within a dense forest of cornstalks to experience the joy that a farmer feels when it comes time to harvest the crop of the season. This feeling of victorious success is sensed with a golden mountain of collected hay-bails, a truck load of bright red tomatoes off to market or your pocket knife cutting off your entry for the giant pumpkin contest at the Coupeville Farmers Market! It was long in coming but well worth the wait. Battling the elements of a long drawn out winter, the hunger of deer and crows and the force of Spring winds, Pumpkinstilskin survived and made it to the pumpkin lineup at the markets festivities with 21 other giant gourds.

I knew Pumpkinstilskin wasn’t a whopper, but it took 2 grown men and all our strength, with 2 rests along the way to drag him on a tarp from the back yard to the front yard and with synchronous timing, to lift him into the truck. With white knuckles and vice-like grips we didn’t drop him either. I’m not boasting of our strength but more of our agility! At the market “Pumpky” was quickly dwarfed by his competition. With his crow-peaked scar that was framed by a disgusting crater-like sunken surface, he was entered into the ugliest contest. Kids were the judges and he came in 2nd place! The largest weighed in at 877.

We only received 9 guesses of our giants’ weight. Those are pretty good odds! The highest guess was 404 lbs and the lowest was 21.5 lbs. The winning guess was 100 lbs. Pumpkinstilskin came in at 108 lbs. Congratulations to Ron and Caroline, who have won an overnight stay at the Anchorage Inn.

ROUND 3….. Have you always wanted to be a doctor but holding a scalpel in your hand wasn’t a comfortable thought? Has the the thought of blood or orange slime been a limiting factor? Well Dr. Dave is at your service! I’ll dissect Pumpkinstilskin for you and remove and count all his vital seeds from within. Now…… How many seeds does this gourd have? Third time’s the charm. If you haven’t won yet, this will be your chance for an overnight stay at the Anchorage Inn. Just send us your guess and the closest guess, without going over, will win! It doesn’t get much easier than that. This contest ends on Nov 11.

“The falling leaves drift by the window. The autumn leaves of red and gold….” Some of you may remember the old classic song by Johnny Mercer “Autumn Leaves”. Its that time of year again when the leaves across the country begin to take on color, the nights are cooler and the pumpkins adorn the porches of many homes.


 – Looking across the street from the inn to Cook’s Park

Have you ever thought to yourself “Why do the leaves change color?”

The US Forest Service has put together a nice web site explaining just that at: http://www.na.fs.fed.us/fhp/pubs/leaves/leaves.shtm

Or have you ever wondered “Does precipitation play a role in leaf color?”

It’s now known that the amount and brilliance of the colors that develop in any particular autumn season are related to weather conditions that occur before and during the time the chlorophyll in the leaves is dwindling. Temperature and moisture are the main influences. The countless combinations of these two highly variable factors assure that no two autumns can be exactly alike.

And if you are just trying to find out where the leaves are turning during a certain week or in a certain place in the country, the Foliage Report Network: http://www.foliagenetwork.com keeps track of leaf colors in the eastern half of the country and the US Forest Service keeps you advised on fall colors throughout the US at: http://www.Fall Colors.com.
World travelers since we last spoke have been Norway and Canada.

Returning Guests that have been awarded Anchorage Inn discounts since our last INNformer totaled:
3rd & 4th visit           reservation for the 10% Pancake discount = 16
5th thru 9th visit       reservation for the 12% Omelet discount = 3
10th thru 19th visit   reservation for the 15% Quiche discount = 1
20 or more visits      reservation for the 20% French Toast discount = 2
That’s quite a turnout of Pancake patrons!!!!

Coupeville – The shortest distance to far away.
Your innkeepers,
Dave and Dianne

October 13, 2011 Posted by | INNformer Newsletter | 3 Comments

INNformer #131 Sept 6

INNformer #131       Sept 6


Hello Mainlanders, Islanders and all those pumpkinologists,

Has summer struck with a vengeance?!? After the morning fog burns off, the sun has been shining until sunset most of the time from Aug 11 thru Sept 6th. Although the temperature ranges from high 70′s to mid 80′s, it can get pretty toasty if you’re out in the sun for too long. Now our guests from AZ & TX all the way over to NY are expressing no sympathy I’m sure! But please remember that we’ve been in an overcast state for 10 months and our bodies are now in a state of shock. Sunshine is forecast for the next 7 days!

Pumpkin Update: Yes, we’ve named our pumpkin! We had 26 names sent to us from our INNformer and Facebook readers. Now these were quite clever and some were rather funny. It was difficult, but we’ve chosen our favorite name and these are the 4 runner ups:
Pump Zilla
Captain Chubby
Cinderella’s Coach
Orange Crush

Pumpkinstilskin
began his (her) youth on the wrong side of the tracks of the garden. I went out one early morning to discover that a pumpkin that I had cut off of the vine had been attacked by, I believe, a crow. It had a hole pecked into its side and the bird had obviously been eating the seeds from within. He then went over to Pumpkinstilskin and began pecking a hole in its side. (This attempted hole can be seen in the bottom photo – right at the tip of the leafs shadow.) Fortunately it didn’t peck deep enough to allow air in and cause rotting to begin. It has made a nice scab over that wound. Then we had a small storm pass through and it sprinkled off and on all afternoon after I had watered the plant. I think that unusually wet day was the cause for the plant’s main vine to split in 3 areas. Because of this, Pumpkinstilskin has seemed to not be getting the same amount of nutrients and appears to be slowing in its growth. Oh, the trials of pumpkin growing!!

ROUND 2 … Win another FREE night stay at the Anchorage Inn B&B. Every year we ask for you to guess the final weight of our pumpkin. Although summer has gotten off to a very late start, hasn’t been very hot, the crows are attacking and the vine is splitting, it is still growing every day. We weigh in on Oct 8th. The closest guess of weight without going over, will win an overnight stay in your choice of any room (excluding the Crow’s Nest Suite and Discovery) at the Anchorage Inn, depending upon availability. Reservations should be made for a visit anytime between Oct 1st, 2011 and May 30th 2012. Round 2 will close on Oct 7th.

14 inches circumference
65 inches circumference

World travelers have arrived from Australia, Israel, United Kingdom and Canada.

Returning Guests that have been awarded discounts since our last INNformer totaled:
3rd & 4th         reservation for the 10% Pancake discount = 6
5th thru 9th     reservation for the 12% Omelet discount = 1
10th thru 19th reservation for the 15% Quiche discount = 2
20th or more   reservation for the 20% French Toast discount = 1
These numbers are down once again because of reunions, weddings and vacationers during the height of the summer season. In 6 weeks business will drop, due to winter knocking on our door.

Coupeville – The shortest distance to far away.
Your innkeepers,
Dave and Dianne

September 8, 2011 Posted by | INNformer Newsletter | Leave a comment

INNformer #130

INNformer #130 Aug 06

Hello Mainlanders, Islanders and those in between,

It’s finally developing into summer with the sun beginning to show itself more and more often. Our mornings usually begin with a regular curtain rehearsal. Quite often we awaken to witness a quickly developing marine fog layer. That curtain pulls completely back by 10am to present the show of summer. The lawn has slowed its pace considerably and has lost its deep green color, the flowers are of a different shape, height and color and have replaced those of last month. The wraparound porch is covered with falling rose petals and has the company of our guests all afternoon and into the early evening as they witness the golden display of the day’s sunset finale.

Pumpkin Update: Good news! We had 2 pumpkins that pollinated. Of those, I had to choose the one farthest from the root and it is gaining about 2 inches in circumference each day.  As of today it is 22.00 inches (55.88 cm) around and weighs approx. 6.27 pounds (2.82 kgrams). I’ve got it up on a pallet (I learned my lesson from last year). Now, if the sun keeps shining, the deer don’t eat it, the bugs stay away and a bolt of lightening doesn’t strike it, we’ll have a champ. It’s holding onto it’s blonde color. We have 64 days to get him really for competition at our Farmers Market on Sat. Oct 8th. See baby photo – 10 days old.

Win a FREE night’s stay at the Anchorage Inn B&B. Every year we ask for a name for our pumpkin. After all, it’s not an “it” any longer. It’s only been 3 weeks since our last INNformer, but we wanted to give everyone a chance to think of a name. Send us your clever, winning suggestion of a name before Sept 1st and the name which is chosen will win an overnight stay in your choice of any room (excluding the Crow’s Nest Suite and Discovery) at the Anchorage Inn, depending upon availability. Reservations should be made for a visit anytime between Oct 1st, 2011 and May 30th 2012.

The 3 Sisters: When growing your garden next year, here is something to remember.
The Three Sisters are squash (or pumpkin), corn and beans which grow and thrive together. Corn serves as the natural trellis for the beans to grow on. The beans’ roots set nitrogen in the soil to nourish the corn. The bean vines help to stabilize the corn stalks on windy days. The squash plants shelter the shallow roots of the corn and shade the ground to discourage weeds and preserve moisture.  Truly a symbiotic relationship.  I have read where it was a common practice to bury a small fish alongside the seeds at planting to nourish the “Three Sisters.”

World travelers have arrived from Italy and Canada. At this pace we may set an all time record for Canadian visitors.

Returning Guests that have been awarded discounts since our last INNformer totaled:
3rd & 4th reservation for the 10% Pancake discount = 1
5th thru 9th reservation for the 12% Omelet discount = 2
10th thru 19th reservation for the 15% Quiche discount = 0
20th or more reservation for the 20% French Toast discount = 1
This number is down considerably due to the number of reunions, weddings and vacationers we’ve had during the height of season.

Well, I could chatter all day long, but i know you’re anxious to put your thinking caps on. Besides that, the Inn hasn’t had a vacancy in 3 weeks and we’re busy as bees.

Coupeville – The shortest distance to far away.
Your innkeepers,
Dave and Dianne

(Leave your pumpkin name suggestion by Sept 1, in the Comments section.)

August 6, 2011 Posted by | Dave's Giant Pumpkin, INNformer Newsletter | Leave a comment

INNformer #129

INNformer #129       July 17

Hello Mainlanders, Islanders and those in between,

Time Rightly Spent. So you roll out of bed, stretch, yawn, pour the coffee, collect the paper from the sidewalk, flip on the early show, and watch young men and women being far too cheerful as they report the weather and some community goings-on. Yet most of the morning’s information is a rehash of what you heard before you went to bed and, worse yet, most of the news is bad. Your mind flashes back to your stay at the Anchorage Inn B&B and you realize that you’re back in the old grind. Don’t be depressed, just find your bootstraps and pull yourself up …. You’ve got the latest INNformer to read.

Happy birthday everyone. We had a perfect 4th of July with clear skies, a mild sea breeze and comfortable temperatures on your island. A panorama of fireworks could be seen in every direction across Penn Cove and as far away as the mainland. The aroma of BBQ’s and the sound of anxious celebrators could be detected all day long. At the breakfast table we all sang our national anthem, including our visitors from Canada. Quite an honorable sound I must say! This is a great place to celebrate a birthday, hint, hint.

Pumpkin Update: As of the 16th of July, I have 2 hardy plants stretching their broad leaves towards the sky in an effort to find some sunshine. 2 days ago was our 7th day this summer with clear skies. It rained yesterday and half of today. One plant has been producing flowers but they’re too close to the root of the vine to accept. Should they produce a pumpkin, this “Atlantic Giant” would pull the plant right out of the ground. July 10th is the standard date to choose a pumpkin from your patch and snip off the others. Well needless to say, the season is behind schedule this year for all pumpkin growers so we’ll have to hope for at least a successfully pollinated flower by the end of the month. I put a boy and girl flower together yesterday, so cross your fingers.

World travelers came from far and wide. We had 3 separate couples in a week arrive from the Netherlands (Holland). These Dutch visitors were here for art classes, visiting friends and just traveling the earth. When I asked our first couple to sing their national anthem, we learned that the words included a devotion to Germany which, due to history, his family didn’t feel comfortable doing, which is understandable. His wife, from Spain, said she’d sing hers, but the best she could do would be to hum it because the anthem had no words. How interesting! We also had guests from Ireland, Australia, Bulgaria and Canada.

Returning Guests that have been awarded discounts since our last INNformer totaled:
3rd & 4th         reservation for the 10% Pancake discount = 6
5th thru 9th     reservation for the 12% Omelet discount = 6
10th thru 19th reservation for the 15% Quiche discount = 1
20th or more   reservation for the 20% French Toast discount = 2

The Grays Harbor Historical Seaport Authority has announced the sailing schedule for the tall ships Lady Washington and Hawaiian Chieftain for the summer of 2011. The schedule marks the 22nd summer that Lady Washington has toured Puget Sound area ports. Ports of call are:

  • Aberdeen: July 1-5
  • Anacortes: July 9-10
  • San Juan Islands (Expedition Voyages Family and Youth Camps): July 11-15
  • Anacortes: July 16-18
  • Bellingham: July 20-August 1
  • Blaine: August 3-7
  • Coupeville: August 11-14 They will enter Deception Pass on slack about 2:30PM 8/11. (Time could change). Expect cannon fire from under the bridge.
  • Brownsville: August 16-21
  • Port Orchard: August 23-24
  • Tacoma: August 26-28
  • Gig Harbor: August 30-31
  • Olympia: Sept. 2-5
  • Kirkland: Sept. 8-12 (Lady Washington only)
  • Aberdeen: Sept. 16-28

Coupeville – The shortest distance to far away.
Your innkeepers,
Dave and Dianne

July 18, 2011 Posted by | Dave's Giant Pumpkin, INNformer Newsletter, Life at the Inn | 1 Comment

INNformer #128

Anchorage Inn
Bed and Breakfast
807 N. Main Street
Coupeville, WA 98239
(360) 678-5581
www.anchorage-inn.com

INNformer #128

Hello Mainlanders, Islanders and those in between,

Winter is throwing rocks – 3 weeks ago, we had a hail storm that lasted almost a half hour. For an amateur weatherman I found it quite exciting. We’d never seen anything like it, leaving our lawns and rooftops as white as snow. This “La Nina” weather condition is certainly not surrendering to Spring and Summer without a fight. As a daily weather reporter for Coupeville in Island county http://www.cocorahs.org/Maps/ViewMap.aspx?state=WA.

5 Interesting facts about those frozen balls of ice. Did you know:

1) Hail comes in many shapes and sizes, ranging from rice sized pellets (1/8″) to giant softballs (4 1/2″). Hail can be clear or white or a combination of the two. Hail can be hard or soft. Wind patterns usually form hailstones into balls, but they can also appear in other shapes, such as cones, discs, stars, pyramids, or just strange looking pointy blobs. We’ve even had reports of donut shaped stones!

2) On July 23, 2010, the largest hailstone ever recorded in the United States in terms of diameter and weight fell in Vivian, South Dakota. The stone had a diameter of 8.0 inches with a circumference of 18.625 inches and weighed 1.9 pounds. No one was injured. This hailstone broke the previous United States hail size record for diameter (7.0 inches – 22 June 2003 in Aurora, NE) and weight (1.67 pounds – 3 September 1970 in Coffeyvile, KS). The Aurora, Nebraska hailstone will retain the record for circumference (18.75 inches).

3) In North America, hail is most common on the High Plains just east of the Rocky Mountains. For example where Colorado, Nebraska, and Wyoming’s borders meet just east of Cheyenne, WY there are an average of 9 to 10 hailstorms each year. Hail in this region occurs between the months of March and October mostly during the afternoon and evening hours, with the bulk of the occurrences from May through September.

4) Hail suppression has been tried by many over the years including silver iodide cloud seeding and types of rockets. “Hail cannons” whose “LOUD” acoustic burst is believed to break-up hail while it is just forming, are still being used in some areas where fruit and vegetables are grown extensively.

5) Hail is found in many countries around the world, such as China. In June 1932 a hailstorm killed an estimated 200 people, and injured thousands more there. Other countries with frequent hailstorms include southern and western Germany, northern Italy, northern India and Croatia.


We have a pumpkin plant! After many attempts and failures at trying to grow a plant, let alone germinate a seed,  I’m proud to say that I came to my senses. Realizing that the weather this year was not going to cooperate and running out of seeds, I asked those in Coupeville who were also growing this Atlantic Giant that produces the orange gem, if they had any extras. Offering to gladly pay for anyone’s extra plant, I received 2 plants for free. Both “would have been tossed on the compost pile within another day or so” if they hadn’t heard my plea. Since we had another drastic storm heading our way, I waited another week to plant it outside. My baby plant now has 4 beautiful leaves and it loves the out of doors. Now, if I can conquer the snails, deer, mold and bugs I might get a pumpkin in a month or so.

Business is picking up. Although not as busy to prior years, our weekends are almost always full. Wednesdays are still almost empty, but that’s always the case until early summer when it finally show signs of vacationers rather than those escaping for the weekend. We do offer a $25 gas Buster discount for a 2 day stay Sun thru Thurs.

World travelers
have visited us from Switzerland, Italy and of course Canada.

Returning Guests that have been awarded discounts since our last INNformer totaled:
3rd & 4th         reservation for the 10% Pancake discount = 11
5th thru 9th     reservation for the 12% Omelet discount = 1
10th thru 19th reservation for the 15% Quiche discount = 1
20th or more   reservation for the 20% French Toast discount = 6

Father’s Day is coming! Yes, it’s just around the corner. Dad’s love to escape just like mom and I’ll bet he’ll bring her with him. Gift certificates are a great idea for Mom or Dad. Give us a call and we’ll take care of the rest.
Coupeville – The shortest distance to far away.
Your innkeepers,
Dave and Dianne

May 31, 2011 Posted by | INNformer Newsletter | Leave a comment

INNformer Newsletter

April 2011

Hello Mainlanders, Islanders and those in between,

Since we last wrote we’ve had quite a variety of weather here in Coupeville. Although we’re famous for our minimal rainfall, we’ve had our fair share, as well as snowfall. But, we can proudly say the sun has been upon us once in a while and the winds have been rather merciful. We can tell Spring time is about to take a major stretch. Daffodils are in full bloom and tulips are only a few days from bursting. And, needless to say, when the ground begins to thaw the grass awakens. Following a gusty evening, I found the lawn was somewhat dry and with it’s appearance a bit shaggy and unappealing I decided I had to mow it. To my surprise, the mower started with the first pull of the ripcord! So with the sun glowing from behind the clouds I actually worked up a sweat. My timing was right on the money because it rained hard the very next day.

It’s pumpkin season! Here it is April and I’m on my 1st attempts to sprout a pumpkin seed. I have 6 wrapped in a couple of wet paper towels and placed gently in a zip lock bag and taped to the hot water pipe leading to one of our hot water heaters. I’ve taken them outside and placed them under a glass bowl to feel the semi warmth of the sun when it shines through the clouds every so often. I’ve also got 4 planted in dirt within a black pot and covered with plastic to keep the moisture in. It sits on a window sill facing the sky where the sun is said to be. It’s all a waiting game. Right now, we’ve seen nothing but clouds for almost 3 weeks straight with measurable rain every day and it looks like we have another week of the same ahead.

We took a short break and went to Disneyland to enjoy the Magic Kingdom with our granddaughters (and their Mom & Dad) for their Spring Break. It was in the mid 70′s and actually warm. Maybe I should have taken my seeds with me. We got plenty of exercise standing in lines, walking from one end of the Magic Kingdom to the other and back again for 3 days. We met Mickey, Goofy and Cinderella and had a great time.


The Tulips are coming! The 28th annual Skagit Valley Tulip Festival, April 1-24 is just around the corner. We still have rooms available, especially mid week to avoid the weekend travelers. Vacation on Whidbey Island is just a skip and a hop from tulip country. Visit Skagit Valley Tulip Festival for a list of events and must see and do’s! While there, enjoy a 15 minute Skagit Valley flightseeing adventure, Kenmore Air beginning at the La Conner waterfront. You’ll never look at the tulip fields the same way again. Want to see the spectacular blooms from a Helicopter instead of a plane?  Classic Helicopter Corp will be doing scenic flights every 15 minutes on Saturday’s and Sunday’s beginning April 8th from the Farmhouse Restaurant (located off HWY 20 & La Conner Whitney Rd.)

Tulip Facts: For some reason, I like facts. Just give me a fact and my ears perk up. Did you know that there are about 3,000 various known varieties of cultivated tulips! The majority of tulips are grown and exported from Holland.

Tulips come in a wide variety of vibrant colors such as red, yellow, orange, purple, pink and bi-colors. A tulip plant has typically 2-6 leaves, while some species have up to 12 leaves. An average height of a tulip plant ranges from 10-70 centimeters (that’s 4-27 inches). Generally, tulips have one flower per stem. However, a few species may have up to four flowers per stem. The attractive, colorful, cup-shaped flowers possess three petals and three sepals. There are six petaloid tepals, marked near the base of the flower with darker markings.

Tulips are classified into 15 classes on the basis of season of bloom, parentage and various floral characteristics. Tulips are available within November to May and they have a life span of 3-7 days. There are three types of tulips depending upon the time of bloom, such as early, midseason and late flowering.

Early flowering tulips, including Red Emperor, Waterlily, Greigii Tulips, bloom in March and early April. Midseason flowering tulips, such as Swan Wings Tulips, Parrot Tulips, Darwin Hybrids, bloom in April and early May. Late flowering tulips such as Rembrandt Tulips, Fringed Tulips bloom in the month of May.

For cultivation of tulip plants, a well-drained, airy, loamy soil is recommended. They require watering after planting during early spring or fall, as well as before blooming and after blooming. Tulip plants should be protected from small animals such as squirrels, rabbits or gophers and the deer of Whidbey Island.

Tulips are in a great demand all over the world. They are used for making the beautiful bouquets and for wonderful floral arrangements. They are an integral part of decorations for some special occasions such as weddings. Tulip is the national flower of Turkey. Tulip flowers are supposed to be a token of a perfect lover, passion, love, declaration of love, romance, fame, charity, dreaminess and a perfect B&B.

Your B&B Kicks Gas! For the next 4 months we’re offering the “Gas Buster Special” stay two consecutive nights, Sunday through Thursday, and we will take $25.00 off your bill to help cover the cost of your gas! Just mention the “Gas Buster Special” when making your reservation to get this rate! If making the reservation online, indicate Gas Buster Special in the notes section. Only one special or discount per visit.

Mother’s Day is coming! Yes, both Mother’s and Father’s Days are just around the corner. Gift certificates are a great idea for either Mom or Dad. Give us a call and we’ll take care of the rest.

Coupeville – The shortest distance to far away.
Your innkeepers,
Dave and Dianne

April 17, 2011 Posted by | Dave's Giant Pumpkin, INNformer Newsletter | Leave a comment

   

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